How Productive Are Your Employees? [Infographic]

A newly created infographic by time tracking and productivity software company, DeskTime, unveils negative working habits… or does it?

According to DeskTime’s research, the average employee will spend 12% of the working day using unproductive applications, such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube. Only 59% of the day is spent using applications, which are deemed productive. This amounts to 65 hours a month, which have not been used productively, according to the data analyzed.

Of course, DeskTime has a vested interest in these results.

DesktTime’s data demonstrates that after a month of using their time tracking system, the productivity of an employee increases by 15%. In theory, DeskTime’s application is for time management and to allow employees to see which applications they use and the amount of time spent productively, unproductively, and neutrally.

It’s my understanding that the application allows you to change sites such as Twitter and Facebook to productivity mode and that employees also have the option to enter “privacy” mode where their time is not tracked. But still… what employee isn’t more productive when they know that their activities are being “monitored”?

Personally, I use social technology as part of my job. I’d hate to think that means I’m a slacker.

Original source: www.prweb.com/releases/time-tracking/desktime/prweb9194932.htm

A direct correlation between tracking employee time and an increase in productivity has been observed after analyzing data about how people typically spend their time at work. This information has been compiled and arranged in the form of an infographic made by DeskTime, which has monitored over 1 million of work hours.

The study shows that the average employee will spend 12% of the working day using unproductive applications, such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube. Only 59% of the day is spent using applications, which are deemed productive. This amounts to 65 hours a month, which have not been used productively.

The date demonstrates that after a month of using a time tracking system, the productivity of an employee increases by 15%. When considering this data it must be understood that the employees have access to the collected time-tracking data, that is, they see which applications they use and they see the amount of time spent productively, unproductively, and neutrally.

Additionally, the statistics show valuable information on generic working habits, such as a high level of different applications used (including both desktop applications, as well as different web sites) – which indicates a tendency to be doing a lot of link-jumping at work. Though this may be a good indicator for PR employees, it might not be the best result for programmers.

The results of the analysis demonstrate that access to employee time tracking statistics are beneficial both for employees to self-manage an increase in their own productivity, as well as for managers to understand the working habits of their employees.

Elizabeth

Elizabeth is a strategic communications leader with nearly 20 years experience in both internal and external communications. She is a passionate advocate for developing communications that foster a stronger relationship between the organization and its employees. She is a global keynote speaker on employee engagement and HR communications. Elizabeth is a certified professional in Employer Brand through Universum Global's Employer Branding Academy.

47 thoughts on “How Productive Are Your Employees? [Infographic]

  1. Productivity of an employee depend on the time tracking implemented by the business . This procedure contribute to the growth / earning resulting to high profile company.

  2. You really make it seem so easy with your presentation but I find this
    matter to be really something that I think I would never understand.
    It seems too complex and extremely broad for me. I am looking forward for your next post,
    I will try to get the hang of it!

  3. I wonder if there’s a fundamental logic flaw here?

    My use of Twitter, for example, is by no means ‘unproductive’. I use the social application PURELY for professional work – keeping up-to-date with research in my field, sharing professional observations with colleagues and others working in the same area, seeking answers to problems I have, and so on. For me, Twitter is a core PRODUCTIVITY tool. I know that many others use that particular tool in the same way.

    So if I’m using Twitter I’m working, not slacking. The same goes for at least 50% of my YouTube use. In fact, without both of these tools my productivity would be significant;y lower.

    I seriously doubt the validity of this type of 21st Century time-and-motion tool. If it doesn’t have the ability to incorporate individual contexts it’s pretty worthless.

  4. This looks like a new example of the Hawthorne Effect. Simply knowing that performance is being monitored is enough to improve performance. It would be interesting to understand how the study accounted for the fact that multiple apps are almost always open simultaneously, and that the multi-tasking office worker is simultaneously talking on the phone or listening to a conference call while in a application.

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