Infographic | The Evolution of Sharing and Communication

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Original source: The Daily Infographic

Communication is the process of conveying information. Almost all species have some sort of communication system. However, successful communication is the trait that has made humans the most successful species.

This infographic shows a timescale of how communication has evolved over time. It’s hard to imagine communication long before the hustle and bustle of email and text messaging. Technological communication has grown exponentially, leaving snail mail to be a thing of the past.

Facebook and Twitter is the most popular form of communication right now. These social giants are changing the game of communication. Today’s communication seems to only be in the form of short spurts with hashtags or tagging. Social media has taken the complexity out of communication, it is no longer organic, but short and to the point.

Today’s style of communication represents the direction society and technology are headed — towards a more efficient form of communication.

Sharing and Communication through the Ages

 

Elizabeth

Elizabeth is a strategic communications leader with nearly 20 years’ experience in both internal and external communications. She is a trailblazer who believes traditional lines between internal and external communications are becoming a thing of the past, and thought leader in advancing organizational objectives and achieving business goals by developing multi-channel communication strategies that support corporate marketing initiatives, increase employee engagement, strengthen corporate culture, and drive company profitability. She is a passionate advocate for developing communications that foster a stronger relationship between the organization and its employees.

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